Speakers

DAY ONE

30 August 2021

DAY TWO

31 August 2021

DAY THREE

1 September 2021

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Key Dates

Registration opens
01 March 2021
Earlybird closes
01 July 2021
Conference dates
29 August - 1 Sept. 2021

Day 1 Speakers – Monday, 30 August 2021

Professor Michael Richardson

Professor Michael Richardson

Macquarie University

Modelling Multiagent Human Perceptual-Motor Behaviour for Human-AI Interaction

My research is directed towards understanding the lawful dynamics of human perception, action, and cognition. I have expertise in experimental and applied psychology, cognitive science, human-movement science, perception-action, joint-action and social coordination, virtual-reality, complex systems, quantitative and statistical analysis methods, and dynamical modeling, AI and human-AI interaction.

Professor Nici Wenderoth

Professor Nici Wenderoth

ETH, Zurich

The neural basis of fatigability: too little inhibition is detrimental for performance

Nicole Wenderoth is Professor for Neural Control of Movement. She is currently the director of the Neural Control of Movement laboratory at the department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zürich, and the director of the Future Health Technologies Programme at the Singapore-ETH-Centre. She received her PhD in Movement Physiology and Biomechanics in 2000 from the German Sport University Cologne. In 2001, she joined the Centre for Movement Control and Neuroplasticity at KU Leuven, Belgium, where she applied advanced medical imaging and brain stimulation techniques to study how the human brain acquires and controls complex multi-effector movements. In 2012 she was appointed as Full Professor for Neural Control of Movement in the Department of Health Sciences and Technology at ETH Zürich where she heads a multidisciplinary research group that develops new interventions for modulating neural processing and human behaviour in health and disease. Since 2020, she leads the interdisciplinary Research Programme Future Health Technologies in Singapore.

Nicole Wenderoth’s Neural Control of Movement Lab investigates how the human brain controls behaviour and flexibly adapts to the environment. We use these insights to decode the human mind via non-invasive interfaces and technologies. This allows us to design modern brain stimulation and neurofeedback paradigms for modulating or self-regulating neural function. Even though our work is motivated by fundamental Systems Neuroscience, we actively pursue translation of our findings to applications in the field of neurorehabilitation and learning sciences. The Lab educates ETH Master Students, PhD Students and Post Docs in critical thinking, scientific reasoning and problem solving in addition to providing hands on training in cutting edge neuroscience techniques.

Professor Daniel Wolpert

Professor Daniel Wolpert

Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, Columbia University, New York

Computational principles underlying the learning of sensorimotor repertoires

Daniel Wolpert read medicine at Cambridge before completing an Oxford Physiology DPhil and a postdoctoral fellowship at MIT. He joined the faculty at the Institute of Neurology, UCL in 1995  and moved to Cambridge University in 2005 where he was Professor of Engineering and a Royal Society Research Professor. In 2018 he joined the Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute at Columbia University as Professor of Neuroscience. He  was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (2012) and  has been awarded the  Royal Society Francis Crick Prize Lecture (2005), the Minerva Foundation Golden Brain Award (2010) and the  Royal Society  Ferrier medal (2020). His research interests are computational and experimental approaches to human movement (www.wolpertlab.com).

Assistant Professor Adrian Haith

Assistant Professor Adrian Haith

Assistant Professor Department of Neurology

Adrian Haith is an Assistant Professor in the department of Neurology. He earned his undergraduate degree in Mathematics from the University of Cambridge, and his PhD from the University of Edinburgh, before joining Johns Hopkins for postdoctoral fellowships with Reza Shadmehr and John Krakauer. His research aims to understand how we plan and generate movements and how we learn new movement skills. He approaches this problem through a combination of behavioral experiments in human subjects and computational models.

Naveed Ejaz

Naveed Ejaz

Naveed is a Scientist specialising in understanding the neurobiology of movement, and how to recover function following neural injury. 

Dr Katja Kornysheva

Dr Katja Kornysheva

Bangor University

Coordinating motor plans for skilled sequence production

Katja obtained her PhD in Psychology (University of Münster, Germany) in 2011 for her work at the MPI for Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig and the MPI for Neurological Research, Cologne. She has subsequently taken up a Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London (UCL) and the Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship in 2012 to conduct her work on the encoding of skilled motor timing at UCL and the Neuroscience Department at Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam. In 2017, Katja has taken up a post as Lecturer (Assistant Professor) at Bangor University where she is now leading the Skilled Action Memory Lab and is now Co-Director of the Bangor Imaging Unit. Her lab focuses on higher motor learning and control, particularly sequence retrieval, preparation and production. To achieve this, Katja’s team utilizes behavioural learning and transfer tasks and neuroimaging pattern analyses (of fMRI and M/EEG). This work is complemented by national and international collaborations with animal model electrophysiologists, computational neuroscientists and clinical researchers to find entry-points for rehabilitation of patients with impaired sequence learning and fluency (dyspraxia and task-specific dystonia).

Associate Professor Colum MacKinnon

Associate Professor Colum MacKinnon

University Of Minnesota

Neuromechanics and neurophysiology of impaired movement preparation, initiation and execution in neurological disorders

Dr. Colum MacKinnon, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor and director of the Movement Disorders Laboratory in the Department of Neurology at the University of Minnesota. He received his PhD in Physiology from the University of Toronto, Canada, and postdoctoral training in neurophysiology and movements disorders in the Human Movement Balance Unit at the Institute of Neurology, London, UK. His research is focused on understanding the mechanisms mediating impaired movement preparation and execution in people with basal ganglia disorders, in particular the neuromechanics and neurophysiology of bradykinesia, akinesia and freezing in people with Parkinson’s disease.

Dr Anna Sadnicka

Dr Anna Sadnicka

St George's University Of London

Kinematic Signatures of the Dystonias

Anna is a Clinical Lecturer fascinated by the neural control of movement and how this is disturbed in movement disorders.

Collaborative projects use motor control and computational techniques to probe disabling movements disorders such as dystonia and tremor.

Her research strives to stimulate better classification of movement disorders, unpick causative neural correlates and translate novel insights into movement retraining strategies / increase the efficacy of current treatments such as deep brain stimulation.

Day 2 Speakers, Tuesday, 31 August 2021

Professor Mark Latash

Professor Mark Latash

The Pennsylvania State University

Referent coordinates for action and perception

Mark Latash is a Distinguished Professor of Kinesiology and Director of the Motor Control Laboratory at the Pennsylvania State University. He received equivalents of B.S. in Physics and M.S. in Physics of Living Systems from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and a Ph.D. in Physiology from Rush University in Chicago. His research interests are focused on the control and coordination of human voluntary movements, movement disorders in neurological disorders, and effects of rehabilitation. He is the author of “Control of Human Movement” (1993) “The Neurophysiological Basis of Movement” (1998, 2008), “Synergy” (2008), “Fundamentals of Motor Control” (2012), “Motor Control and Biomechanics. Defining Central Concepts” (with V.M. Zatsiorsky, 2016), and “Physics of Biological Action and Perception” (2019). In addition, he edited ten books and published over 400 papers in refereed journals. Mark Latash served as the Founding Editor of the journal “Motor Control” (1996-2007) and as President of the International Society of Motor Control (2001-2005). He has served as Director of the annual Motor Control Summer School series since 2004. He is a recipient of the Bernstein Prize in motor control.

Professor Apostolos Georgopoulos

Professor Apostolos Georgopoulos

University Of Minnesota

At the motor confluence of three 20th century giants: Following the footsteps of Nikolai Bernstein, Donald Hebb and Karl Lashley

Apostolos P. Georgopoulos, MD, PhD is Regents Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Minnesota. He obtained his degrees from the University of Athens, Greece. He trained in neurophysiology with Dr. Vernon B. Mountcastle, at Johns Hopkins University, where he rose to the rank of Full Professor of Neuroscience in 1986. Dr. Georgopoulos pioneered the application of analyses of neuronal populations to decipher the brain mechanisms underlying the planning of movement and cognitive operations, such as mental rotation, memory scanning, copying shapes, and mental object construction using neurophysiological and functional brain imaging techniques, including magnetoencepahlography and functional brain imaging. Dr. Georgopoulos is an elected member of the US National Academy of Medicine, the Academy of Athens, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences. He is the recipient of the American Legion Distinguished Service Medal-2017, the Immigrant of Distinction Award of the American Association of Immmigration Lawyers-2017, the Bernstein International Prize for Motor Control-2015, the Cozzarelli Prize of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA-2012, the Fondation IPSEN Neuronal Plasticity Prize, Paris, France-2009, the Krieg Cortical Discoverer Award, Cajal Club, USA-2006, the Santiago Grisolia Chair, Valencia, Spain-2003, the Carnegie Centenary Professorship, The Carnegie trust for the Universities of Scotland-2002, the George Morgan Award for Creativity and Innovation in Interdisciplinary Education, Brown University, Providence, RI-1997, the King Solomon Israel Prize in Neuroethology-1996, and the Arturo Rosenbluth Professorship, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Mexico City, Mexico-1991.

Dr Hayley MacDonald

Dr Hayley MacDonald

University Of Birmingham

The Role of Dopamine in Impulse Control: How Biology Influences Behaviour

Hayley studied at the University of Auckland in New Zealand where she did her PhD as a Neurological Foundation of New Zealand W&B Miller Postgraduate Scholar under the supervision of Professor Winston Byblow and Associate Professor Greg Anson. During her PhD she investigated behavioural, genetic, and neurophysiological mechanisms of motor impulse control and the potential implications for Parkinson’s disease. Hayley then used her Philip Wrightson Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Neurological Foundation of New Zealand to work at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom with Dr Ned Jenkinson and Dr Simon Hanslmayr. As a postdoctoral fellow she investigated the relationship between impaired beta oscillations and memory deficits in Parkinson’s disease. Hayley is now a Lecturer in Motor Neuroscience at the University of Birmingham where she continues research in these areas.

Professor Daniel Hutto

Professor Daniel Hutto

University Of Wollongong

Habits as the Basis of Skilled Embodied Performance

Daniel D. Hutto is Senior Professor of Philosophical Psychology and Head of the School of Liberal Arts at the University of Wollongong. He served on the Australian Research Council College of Experts, chairing its Humanities and Creative Arts panel. He is the author of award-winning, highly cited research, with 7 books (3 with MIT Press) and over 130 research papers in peer-reviewed journals and books chapters to his name. He is co-author of the award-winning Radicalizing Enactivism (MIT, 2013) and its sequel, Evolving Enactivism (MIT, 2017). His other recent books, include: Folk Psychological Narratives (MIT, 2008) and Wittgenstein and the End of Philosophy (Palgrave, 2006). He is editor of Narrative and Understanding Persons (CUP, 2007) and Narrative and Folk Psychology (Imprint Academic, 2009). A special yearbook, Radical Enactivism, focusing on his philosophy of intentionality, phenomenology and narrative, was published in 2006. He is regularly invited to speak internationally, not only at philosophy conferences but at expert meetings of anthropologists, clinicians, educationalists, narratologists, neuroscientists and psychologists.

Professor Karin Roelofs

Professor Karin Roelofs

Donders Institute For Brain Cognition And Behavior, Radboud University Nijmegen

Neural control of emotional action

Karin Roelofs is Professor of Experimental Psychopathology at the Radboud University Nijmegen (Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour and Behavioural Science Institute). She is chair of the Affective Neuroscience group of the Donders Centre of Cognitive Neuroimaging http://www.roelofs-epan.nl, studying neural determinants of defensive freeze-fight-flight action and their role in long term stress-resilience and stress-related disorders. In addition, she applies hormonal, neural stimulation (TMS, tACS) and VR-biofeedback interventions to directly influence emotional action control and stress-resilience. Based on these works she won the Evens Science Prize 2020 (international prize for societally-relevant cognitive neuroscience). Karin Roelofs is elected member of the Dutch Royal Science Academy (KNAW) and Academia Europaea (AE) and vice president of the Association of ERC grantees (AERG) and the International Resilience Alliance (INTRESA). Her research is funded by several European (ERC-consolidator and Horizon2020) and National (NWO-VICI and NWO-consortium) grants.

Dr Arne Nieuwenhuys

Dr Arne Nieuwenhuys

University of Auckland

Anxiety and perceptual-motor performance: toward an integrated understanding of concepts, mechanisms and processes

Arne Nieuwenhuys is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Exercise Sciences at The University of Auckland. Arne obtained his PhD in Human Movement Sciences from VU University Amsterdam in 2012 and, prior to coming to New Zealand, has worked as an Assistant Professor at Radboud University Nijmegen in The Netherlands.

At the University of Auckland, Arne teaches several undergraduate and postgraduate papers in Sport, Exercise and Performance Psychology and is leader of the postgraduate research programme in Exercise Sciences. He is Associate Editor for the Journal of Sport and Exercise Science (JSES) and the European Journal of Sport Science (EJSS).

Arne has been a recipient of early-career research grants in both New Zealand and The Netherlands (Royal Society Marsden Fast-Start grant, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research VENI grant). His research aims to understand how psycho-physiological states such as anxiety, fatigue and sleep influence human movement and performance. By understanding how critical cognitive and motor functions are affected by (changes in) individuals’ psycho-physiological states, Arne aims to develop evidence-based interventions that help people improve their performance in those situations where it counts the most.

Professor Marco Santello

Professor Marco Santello

Arizona State University

Neural control of dexterous manipulation

Marco Santello received a Bachelor in Kinesiology from the University of L’Aquila, Italy, in 1990 and a Doctoral degree in Sport and Exercise Science from the University of Birmingham (U.K.) in 1995. After a post-doctoral fellowship at the Department of Physiology (now Neuroscience) at the University of Minnesota, he joined the Department of Kinesiology at Arizona State University (ASU) (1999-2010). He is currently Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Director, and Harrington Endowed Chair at the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering. His main research interests are motor control, learning, haptics, and multisensory integration. His Neural Control of Movement laboratory uses complementary research approaches, ranging from non-invasive neuromodulation to motion tracking, electroencephalography, and virtual reality environments. His work (130+ publications) has been published in neuroscience and engineering journals, and has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, DARPA, the Whitaker Foundation, The Mayo Clinic, and Google. He is Director of the NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center BRAIN on neurotechnology. He has served as grant reviewer for US and European funding agencies, and member of the Editorial Board of Transactions on Haptics and The Journal of Assistive, Rehabilitative and Therapeutic Technologies. He is a member of the Society for Neuroscience, the Society of Neural Control of Movement, ISEK, and IEEE.

Dr Jing Xu

Dr Jing Xu

University Of Georgia

Do we need finger individuation in precision grip?

Jing Xu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Georgia. She is the director of the Cognition and Dexterity (CoDex) Laboratory and co-director of the Neurostimulation Laboratory. Her research aims to understand how humans learn complex motor skills and how to restore them after neuromuscular injuries. Before joining UGA, she was an Assistant Research Scientist at the Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare at the Johns Hopkins University. She did her post-doctoral research with Dr. John Krakauer in the Department of Neurology at Johns Hopkins, focusing on tracking biomarkers of stroke patients’ motor function recovery from acute to chronic stages. Jing received her Ph.D. training in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, with Drs Rich Ivry and Tom Griffiths, where she studied human inhibitory control, memory, category learning.

Professor Steven Chase

Professor Steven Chase

Carnegie Mellon University

Acting out your feelings: Internal state signals in motor cortex

Steven Chase is a Professor jointly appointed in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and the Neuroscience Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his BS in Applied Physics from Caltech in ‘97, his MS in Electrical Engineering from UC Berkeley in ‘99, and his PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins in ‘06. He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation’s Faculty Early Career Development Award. For his research, he designs brain-computer interfaces and used them to study motor learning and motor control.

Day 3 Speakers – Wednesday, 1 September 2021

Professor Rachael Seidler

Professor Rachael Seidler

University Of Florida

Adapting Movement Control to the Microgravity Environment

Rachael Seidler is a Professor in the Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology at the University of Florida. Her research focuses on the neural control of movement in health and disease, with a specific focus on motor learning. She uses a range of neuroimaging and neuromodulation techniques coupled with precise measures of movement and cognitive function to determine the neurocognitive underpinnings of motor control. Dr. Seidler has expertise working with a variety of populations including healthy young and older adults, patients with Parkinson’s disease, and NASA astronauts in both basic science and intervention experiments. Her work is currently supported by the NIH, the NSF, NASA, and ONR. Active work in her lab includes investigation of human brain plasticity with spaceflight and experiments investigating how age changes in brain structure and function associate with movement and cognitive performance.

Associate Professor Jordan Taylor

Associate Professor Jordan Taylor

Princeton University

The influence of strategic planning processes on learning an internal model de novo

Jordan Taylor is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Princeton University and Associated Faculty at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute. Prior to joining the faculty at Princeton, he completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley and received his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis. His research seeks to understand how explicit, cognitive strategies influence sensorimotor skill acquisition and motor control. Ultimately, the hope for this work is that it could lead to the development of optimal neurorehabilitation protocols to guide learning toward different, but still functioning learning mechanisms following stroke or disease. His research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research.

Dr Joseph Galea

Dr Joseph Galea

University Of Birmingham

Enhancing motor performance with reward

I completed my PhD on bimanual coordination in the School of Psychology, University of Birmingham with Prof. Chris Miall (2008). I subsequently worked at Johns Hopkins as a research fellow where I investigated the neural correlates of motor learning with Dr Pablo Celnik, and then moved to University College London as a senior research fellow with Prof. John Rothwell and became interested in the role of dopamine in motor learning. In 2012, I took up an independent research fellow post at the University of Birmingham (funded by the ‘Birmingham Fellows’ scheme), became a Senior Lecturer in 2016 and a Reader in 2020. The lab is broadly interested in motor control and learning. We use behavioural, non-invasive stimulation, brain imaging, genetics and pharmacology techniques to better understand how our brain controls and learns movements in health and disease. At present, much of our work is focused on understanding how reward/punishment-based feedback can be used to alter motor performance and learning.

Professor Carolee Winstein

Professor Carolee Winstein

University of Southern California

Translating the Science into Best Practices to Optimize Recovery in Neurorehabilitation

Carolee Winstein is Professor in the Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy at the University of Southern California. She holds a joint appointment in the Department of Neurology at the Keck School of Medicine.

Winstein practiced physical therapy for 10 years at Rancho Los Amigos National Medical Center in southern California where she focused exclusively in the area of neurology. Winstein’s subsequent doctoral training focused on the behavioral basis of motor control and learning with a minor in biomechanics followed by a postdoctoral fellowship in speech and motor control at UW Madison, WI.

Winstein’s research program from the early 1990’s until now has concentrated on the development of non-pharmacologic rehabilitation interventions motivated and informed by brain and behavioral science to enhance or even accelerate recovery in persons who have damage to the CNS. She has conceived and led small scale research projects, medium size phase I and II clinical trials and large scale, Phase III pragmatic trials, all in sensorimotor rehabilitation.

Along with her research, Winstein is committed to mentoring the next generation of clinician scientists who will move this field forward. She believes that effective mentoring, similar to research entails a collaboration tailored to one’s interests and career goals.

Professor Monica Perez

Professor Monica Perez

Shirley Ryan Abilitylab

Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury: Need for Optimization and Mechanisms

Dr. Perez is the Scientific Chair of the Arms + Hands Lab at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, a Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Northwestern University, and a Research Scientist at the Edward Jr. Hines VA Hospital. She has studied neural mechanisms contributing to the control of voluntary movement in healthy humans and in people with spinal cord injury for over 15 years. Her research aims to understand how the brain and spinal cord contribute to the control of movement with the ultimate goal of using this mechanistic information to develop more effective rehabilitation therapies for people with spinal cord injury. This theme is mainly investigated from a neurophysiological point of view, using a combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnetic resonance imaging, electrical stimulation, and behavioral techniques.

Dr Daniele Piscitelli

Dr Daniele Piscitelli

McGill University, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy

From neurophysiology to neurorehabilitation: a Motor Control perspective

Daniele Piscitelli, PT, PhD, is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at McGill University, Canada, under the directorship of Dr. Mindy F. Levin. Currently, he is also affiliated with the University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy as a Researcher and Director of the Physical Therapy Program. For the academic year 20/21, he was appointed as Assistant Professor at Pacific University, USA. He is a researcher with a background in neuroscience, neurorehabilitation, and clinical research design. He has a strong interest in rehabilitation after stroke, neural motor control, and psychometric assessment of outcome measures. His research focuses on understanding the neurophysiological mechanisms of motor control and how this knowledge can be translated into clinical research and clinical practice to promote recovery after brain lesions. Dr. Piscitelli has published several original papers and theoretical works in peer-review journals about the underlying motor control mechanisms in post-stroke recovery, despite a relatively young research-active career. He serves as a reviewer for high impact factor journals, national grant agencies, and international congresses. He is committed to promoting excellence in science and translating theoretical concepts of motor control into clinical research to develop more effective treatment strategies to guide rehabilitation approaches.

Professor John Montgomery

Professor John Montgomery

University Of Auckland

Vertebrate Motor Control: A Neuroethological Perspective

John Montgomery holds a University of Bristol PhD and DSc, with the PhD work on shark vestibulo-cerebellum done at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Plymouth. His academic career has been at the University of Auckland where he was Director of the Leigh Marine Laboratory, and a newly established Institute for Marine Science, and also a Principal Investigator in the Centre for Brain Research. His scientific work sits at the interface of marine science and neuroscience and he has published extensively on sensory behaviour and physiology of fish, including hearing, hydrodynamic senses, and the quite extraordinary electrosensory system of sharks and rays. The neuroethology context of his work includes the cerebellum-like neural circuitry to distinguish signal and noise in sensory input. This work includes the book “Evolution of the Cerebellar Sense of Self” that explores the evolutionary origins of the cerebellum, and the generality of the ‘adaptive filter’ computational capabilities of the cerebellar circuitry. His work is strongly interdisciplinary and has extensive overlap with engineering approaches and the use of biomimetics in engineering design.

Professor Chris Miall

Professor Chris Miall

University Of Birmingham

Motor control and somatosensory loss

Chris Miall works in sensorimotor neuroscience, with interests in motor learning, predictive control, and sensory loss. He is Emeritus Professor in the School of Psychology, University of Birmingham.

Associate Professor Andrew Pruszynski

Associate Professor Andrew Pruszynski

Western University

Somatosensory processing for real world hand control

Dr. Andrew Pruszynski is an Associate Professor in the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology at Western University in London, Canada where he holds a Canada Research Chair in Sensorimotor Neuroscience. His research investigates the neural control of movement, specifically how somatosensory inputs from the skin and muscles influence reaching, grasping and object manipulation.